Philosophical Nuggets @ Red Lion Books: taster session

Saturday 12th September at 3.00 pm. Cost £2.00 This is a taster for a 10 week course of philosophy for those with enquiring minds. The sessions will be led by Nick Joll who has taught philosophy at University of Essex and for the Open University and are intended to explore key areas of philosophical enquiry … Continue reading Philosophical Nuggets @ Red Lion Books: taster session

Saturday 12th September at 3.00 pm.

Cost £2.00

This is a taster for a 10 week course of philosophy for those with enquiring minds. The sessions will be led by Nick Joll who has taught philosophy at University of Essex and for the Open University and are intended to explore key areas of philosophical enquiry in a light and engaging manner. Tea and biscuits will be on hand to help the grey cells grind into gear!

The starting date for the course will be confirmed very soon.

The cost will be £100.00 for the full 10 week course which will be split into two 5 week sections at £50.00.

Each week will explore some thought-provoking philosophical passages. The passages will be made accessible; prior exposure to philosophy is not required. The passages will be provided on handouts, together with suggestions for further reading. Much of that further reading is in J. Stangroom and J. Garvey, The Story of Philosophy: A History of Western Thought (Quercus, 2012).

WEEKS 1 – 5: METAPHYSICAL NUGGETS  

  1. Cold fires, silent crashes: Locke & Berkeley on qualities
  2. ‘Existence precedes essence’: Sartre on being human
  3. ‘Mad pain and Martian Pain’: David Lewis on the mind
  4. ‘The thing things world’: Heidegger on sustaining a world
  5. The place of evidence in religion (Kierkegaard, Wittgenstein)

WEEKS 6 – 10: VALUE AND MEANING

  1. ‘God is dead [. . . ] Is not the greatness of this deed too great for us?’  Nietzsche, God, ethics
  2. ‘Forty-two’: the meaning of life and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
  3.  ‘A good philosophical work could be written that would consist only of jokes’: Wittgenstein
  4.  ‘To pronounce anything a work of art is [. .] to make a momentous moral judgment’: Clive Bell on art and ethics
  5.  ‘Subjective and objective have become reversed’: Adorno on ideals of knowledge

Book of the Week, 22nd August 2015

A Game for All the Family

Sophie Hannah

A Game for All the Family

Sophie Hannah

Justine has grown tired of her stressful, high powered TV executive job. So accompanied by opera singer husband, Alex, and 14 year old daughter, Ellen, she leaves London and heads to Devon to begin new life She dreams of a relaxing life free from the demands of work. But her new life turns out to … Continue reading Book of the Week, 22nd August 2015

Justine has grown tired of her stressful, high powered TV executive job. So accompanied by opera singer husband, Alex, and 14 year old daughter, Ellen, she leaves London and heads to Devon to begin new life She dreams of a relaxing life free from the demands of work. But her new life turns out to be far from idyllic. She discovers a story that Ellen is writing for a homework assignment. It is set in their new home and describes a murder. The characters seem disturbingly real. Meanwhile Ellen’s best friend, George is expelled from school. Justine contacts her daughter’s teachers only to find that the school has no record of George. Anonymous notes and threatening phone calls follow and the family face increasing danger as imagination and reality clash. Oddball characters and a strand of dark humour make this an intriguing and original psychological crime drama.

Inner Space: an exhibition of art by Judith Barford

From 28th September 2015 We are pleased to be hosting this unusual and exciting exhibition by Judith Barford. Judith has produced a series of lino relief prints and collage which arose out of her interest in repeating patterns and forms found in the natural world, including inside our own bodies.The images are not intended to be … Continue reading Inner Space: an exhibition of art by Judith Barford

From 28th September 2015

BARFORDMUSCLEWe are pleased to be hosting this unusual and exciting exhibition by Judith Barford. Judith has produced a series of lino relief prints and collage which arose out of her interest in repeating patterns and forms found in the natural world, including inside our own bodies.The images are not intended to be accurate representations of our biology but rather an attempt to depict the inherent beauty and complexity of our inner physical world. They are all made by cutting and etching into lino. Some are collages made of prints which cut up and superimposed onto other prints. The images are printed using predominantly reds and oranges: life-blood colours.

BARFORDHEARTJudith’s professional life was in social work but she has always been interested in art and went on various courses culminating in the part-time foundation course at Colchester Institute in 1995. During the course she became interested in print making and 3D work and joined Cuckoo Farm Print workshop when the course ended, continuing to work there until recently.

She has previously taken part in group exhibitions with Print Workshop colleagues at Colchester Library, The Mercury Theatre and the Benham Gallery.

 

Book of the Week, 15th August 2015

PostCapitalism: A Guide to Our Future

Paul Mason

PostCapitalism: A Guide to Our Future

Paul Mason

The crash of 2008 gave the world a shock. Nobody understood the complex financial products that a new generation of bankers had dreamed up. They were worth only what other investors believed they were worth. And when the bubble birth their illusory value disappeared. Now after trillions of pounds of newly created money has been … Continue reading Book of the Week, 15th August 2015

The crash of 2008 gave the world a shock. Nobody understood the complex financial products that a new generation of bankers had dreamed up. They were worth only what other investors believed they were worth. And when the bubble birth their illusory value disappeared. Now after trillions of pounds of newly created money has been poured into the banking system a kind of stability has been achieved. This book argues that capitalism as we know it may not last forever and looks at what a sustainable economic system of the future might look like. The growth of the internet has made possible a range of alternatives. Crowd funding for new entrepreneurs, peer to peer file sharing sites and blogging platforms all have in common a less centralised and more democratic co operative structure. Wikipedia, the biggest online information resource, is the joint creation of thousands of contributors and is free for all to access. These are signs that the days of giant banks and multinational corporations may be numbered.

Book of the Week, 8th August 2015

The Children Act

Ian McEwan

The Children Act

Ian McEwan

Adam, a talented and creative seventeen year old boy, lies critically ill in hospital. He and his devoutly religious family refuse the medical treatment that he needs because of their beliefs. The case is referred by the hospital to the courts for a ruling on whether the wishes of the family can be overridden. Experienced … Continue reading Book of the Week, 8th August 2015

Adam, a talented and creative seventeen year old boy, lies critically ill in hospital. He and his devoutly religious family refuse the medical treatment that he needs because of their beliefs. The case is referred by the hospital to the courts for a ruling on whether the wishes of the family can be overridden. Experienced and successful family law specialist Fiona Maye is the High Court judge who must make the decision. For Fiona, the case comes at a time when her personal life is in crisis and it is a case that challenges her professional detachment. Ian McEwan masterfully weaves a gripping personal story with an examination of the law and ethics involved when religion and medical science clash. It is an elegantly written novel that speaks to both the heart and the head.

Book of the Week, 25th July 2015

The Girl Next Door

Ruth Rendell

The Girl Next Door

Ruth Rendell

Ruth Rendell, who died earlier this year, was a legend amongst crime writers. Born in Essex she left school to become a journalist working for the Chigwell Times. But when she filed a story of a sports club dinner she had not even attended she was fired. Her report failed to mention the sudden death … Continue reading Book of the Week, 25th July 2015

Ruth Rendell, who died earlier this year, was a legend amongst crime writers. Born in Essex she left school to become a journalist working for the Chigwell Times. But when she filed a story of a sports club dinner she had not even attended she was fired. Her report failed to mention the sudden death of the after dinner speaker half way through his speech!

Just out in paperback, ‘The Girl Next Door’ shows Rendell’s powers undiminished. In Loughton in the 1950’s a group of local children regularly play in old wartime tunnels until a neighbour scares them off. Seventy years later as the site is developed two severed skeletal hands are discovered inside a biscuit tin buried in a the tunnels. The childhood playmates are reunited as a police investigation into the grisly remains gathers pace. With the hunt for the killer in the background the story focuses on this group of ageing friends. Their lives and their loves; their secrets and their fears as they face the end of their own lives are woven into this startlingly original crime drama.