A Thought for Fathers Day.

Forget the socks and aftershave, the gadgets for reluctant cooks. Show you care on Fathers Day and give your Dad some books!  

Forget the socks and aftershave,
the gadgets for reluctant cooks.
Show you care on Fathers Day
and give your Dad some books!

 

Book of the Week, 9th June 2018

The World's Worst Children Three

David Walliams

The World's Worst Children Three

David Walliams

The list of entertainers who have tried their hand at writing for children is really quite long –  but the number who have been successful is very short. Top of that list is David Walliams who has just released his third collection of stories about the World’s Worst Children! Within these pages we meet Bonnie … Continue reading Book of the Week, 9th June 2018

The list of entertainers who have tried their hand at writing for children is really quite long –  but the number who have been successful is very short. Top of that list is David Walliams who has just released his third collection of stories about the World’s Worst Children!

Within these pages we meet Bonnie Bossypants who bosses everyone around. She sends her father to his room for not finishing his peas and her mother for speaking without putting her hand up first. Pretty soon she’s bossing her teachers at school until ‘Wonder nanny’ arrives to sort her out.

There’s Fanny who loves to shock, appal and terrify people with the horrible faces she pulls. But when she scares the guards on sentry duty at Buckingham Palace it turns out to be a step too far.

Worst of the bunch is boastful Barnabus who goes to the poshest school in the country. Each time he boasts his head swells until something pricks his inflated self-importance – literally.

These laugh out loud tales reach a satisfying conclusion as each child gets their deserved comeuppance.  

HarperCollins Hardback, £14.99

Book of the Week, May 26th 2018

Factfulness

Hans Rosling

Factfulness

Hans Rosling

They say no news is good news.  But what that means, of course, is that the stories in our newspapers and TV bulletins tend mostly to be bad news. And in turn our view of the world is coloured by this tendency. This book analyses that negative influence on our world view – and it … Continue reading Book of the Week, May 26th 2018

They say no news is good news.  But what that means, of course, is that the stories in our newspapers and TV bulletins tend mostly to be bad news. And in turn our view of the world is coloured by this tendency.

This book analyses that negative influence on our world view – and it is a dramatic bias. In a survey people were asked a series of questions about such important issues as levels of child poverty, disease, deaths from natural disasters and many other important world trends. Most people believed the world to be in a much worse state than it really is. And the difference was so great that even journalists, scientists and politicians were less accurate in answering these questions than chimpanzees picking answers at random!

The bias runs through all the media. The unusual and dramatic always attract the most attention. One death from a bear attack in Sweden, for example, generates acres of news print while numerous deaths resulting from domestic violence are barely mentioned. When such distortions affect political decision-making and budgeting the result can affect every one of us.

This book is both a call to look more carefully at the world and manifesto for rationality and good sense in all walks of life.

Sceptre hardback, £12.99

Book of the Week, May 19th 2018

This is Going to Hurt

Adam Kay

This is Going to Hurt

Adam Kay

After six gruelling years working as a junior doctor Adam Kay’s medical career ended abruptly after a particularly traumatic experience.  He had recorded his journey from House Officer through to Senior Registrar in dairies and, discovering a talent for writing and performing, he turned his experiences first into a stand-up musical comedy show and eventually … Continue reading Book of the Week, May 19th 2018

After six gruelling years working as a junior doctor Adam Kay’s medical career ended abruptly after a particularly traumatic experience.  He had recorded his journey from House Officer through to Senior Registrar in dairies and, discovering a talent for writing and performing, he turned his experiences first into a stand-up musical comedy show and eventually into this award-winning book.

It is by turns both shockingly funny and heart breaking as he describes the people and situations that are faced daily by junior doctors.  As his speciality he chose obstetrics and gynaecology, known in medical school as “brats and twats”.  And he has some hilarious stories to tell, some involving extremely unusual objects and his patient’s most private parts! But there is also the pain and loss when things don’t go to plan and the drama of emergency operations.

The book also documents the effect that working a 97-hour week can have on the lives of our young doctors; the stress, the cancelled holidays and the fractured relationships. Written as mass demonstrations against recent NHS ‘reforms’ were taking place he observes that in fact that the £3 an hour parking meter outside was actually earning more than he was!

Picador paperback, £8.99

Upcycled Fabric Sculpture: an exhibition by Anna Boon

A unique exhibition of sculptures made from old t-shirts, resin and wire transformed to replicate bronze and stone. Of he work, Anna says…. “I am intrigued with how objects are frequently discarded when they become old and worn. I hope within my work to show there can be beauty within ageing and those marks of … Continue reading Upcycled Fabric Sculpture: an exhibition by Anna Boon

A unique exhibition of sculptures made from old t-shirts, resin and wire transformed to replicate bronze and stone.

Of he work, Anna says….

“I am intrigued with how objects are frequently discarded when they become old and worn. I hope within my work to show there can be beauty within ageing and those marks of time should be venerated for the life travelled, character and memories they evoke.”

Anna’s  work move between painting and sculpture. Underlying both is a need to explore colour, texture and the figurative form.  Within sculpture Anna has found a  method of transforming old t-shirts, resin and wire into sculptures that replicate bronze and stone. The resulting sculptures capture the ethereal beauty, fluidity and movement of the figure.  The paintings displayed are inspired by an old  steamer trunk and the beautifully aged labels that had survived many journey over decades of use.

Anna grew up in Cornwall, moved briefly to Glasgow and has since settled in Suffolk.  After a career in the travel industry and bringing up two children she fulfilled a long held ambition to study art and gained a BA (Hons) degree in Fine Art from Colchester School of Art and Design in 2008.

Anna is also a tutor and runs regular classes in drawing and painting in Nayland and West Bergholt. Please see her website for details www.annaboon.co.uk.

Book of the Week, May 12th 2018

Mrs Moreau's Warbler

Stephen Moss

Mrs Moreau's Warbler

Stephen Moss

It’s pretty clear how some birds got their names. Blackcap and whitethroat for instance are simply descriptive. Or cuckoo and screech owl where the song or call is referenced. Then there are birds like the woodpecker or flycatcher whose name describes their behaviour. But for most birds the name is a puzzle. The bearded tit … Continue reading Book of the Week, May 12th 2018

It’s pretty clear how some birds got their names. Blackcap and whitethroat for instance are simply descriptive. Or cuckoo and screech owl where the song or call is referenced. Then there are birds like the woodpecker or flycatcher whose name describes their behaviour.

But for most birds the name is a puzzle. The bearded tit is neither bearded nor a tit!  And what of the isabelline wheatear? Could it be named after Princess Isabella, sixteenth century ruler of the Netherlands? Isabella vowed not to change her underwear until the siege of Ostend was over. Unfortunately, it lasted three years and the colour of her undergarments became known as Isabelline!

There are names which are older than the Anglo-Saxon era.  Auk is from old Norse, rook is Germanic and the word goose, our oldest bird name,  has been tracked back to the steppes of eastern Europe, more than five thousand years ago.

This is a fascinating exploration of our birds, tracing their names through history, folk lore, literature and science and spiced with the intrepid adventures some distinctly eccentric ornithologists.