‘Ancient Japan: an exhibition of prints and textiles by Norah Stocker

 ‘Ancient Japan’ by Norah Stocker Exhibition runs from 2nd – 26th May 2017 Printmaking: This is a series of prints inspired by works of Japanese artist Utamaro (1753-1806) his beautiful detailed work using woodblock printing. Utamaro uses line and pattern on sumptuous fabrics and courtesans in their daily life. For the last three years I … Continue reading ‘Ancient Japan: an exhibition of prints and textiles by Norah Stocker

 ‘Ancient Japan’ by Norah Stocker
Exhibition runs from 2nd – 26th May 2017

Printmaking: This is a series of prints inspired by works of Japanese artist Utamaro (1753-1806) his beautiful detailed work using woodblock printing. Utamaro uses line and pattern on sumptuous fabrics and courtesans in their daily life.

For the last three years I have been exploring the Japanese philosophy of Wabi Sabi in my art and textile work. Natural forms and the spiritual symbolism, the cycle of life and rebirth, impermanence, decay and incomplete. Fine art printmaking will be incorporated into future works of my art on textiles and papers as it will in my teaching.

I am exploring ideas of creating visual decay in methods of applying the inks in soft tonal colours and ghost prints to create small ancient art. Papers will play a very important part of my future work. 

Textiles: The Boro – Japan: exploring stories through threads of life of an impoverished past Japan 15C. Woven, patched, indigo, rags from worn-down workwear and covers in todays world. frayed

Norah is a qualified Printmaker, Art, Design & Textile Artist and teacher of City & Guilds.

 She exhibits throughout East Anglia annually at Quay Gallery Snape Maltings, Braintree Museum, Colchester Minories Gallery and at many other venues.

Find out more about Norah’s work here

 

Book of the Week, May 6th

Admissions: A Life in Brain Surgery.

Henry Marsh

Admissions: A Life in Brain Surgery.

Henry Marsh

Leading neurosurgeon Henry Marsh won acclaim for his first book ‘Do No Harm’. Now retired, this book reflects on a career where decisions are taken daily that can mean life or death for patients. For Marsh, retirement was never going to mean the quiet life. He heads off to Nepal to help out at a … Continue reading Book of the Week, May 6th

Leading neurosurgeon Henry Marsh won acclaim for his first book ‘Do No Harm’. Now retired, this book reflects on a career where decisions are taken daily that can mean life or death for patients.

For Marsh, retirement was never going to mean the quiet life. He heads off to Nepal to help out at a clinic in Kathmandu, beneath the cloud shrouded Himalayas, where people might hike for days to reach it. And then to Ukraine to help train neurosurgeons in a country struggling to provide the basic medical care expected in a developed country.

Back home he buys a derelict cottage beside a canal. He aims to transform it to a place of beauty but wonders whether he will have time enough even to make it habitable.

 

Detailed accounts of operating to remove brain tumours are interspersed with tender memories of his insecure childhood and troubled adolescence.

He is opinionated and by turns passionate and tender as he reflects on a life time in medicine. On chronic underfunding of the NHS and of the of the cowardly politicians who watch while private companies ‘circle like hyenas around a elderly elephant’.

With honesty, he recalls not just the successes but also his mistakes and considers the decisions that must be made if ‘the doctor’s role is to reduce suffering and not just to save life at any cost.’

Orion Hardback, £16.99.

Meet the authors: Stephen May and Emma Kittle Pey

Thursday 27th April at 6.30 pm Come and meet two authors and hear about their new books. In a unique partnership this event will be hosted by the irrepressible Anthony Roberts on a rare night off from the Arts Centre! This is a free event but space is limited so please email us@redlionbooks.co.uk to reserve … Continue reading Meet the authors: Stephen May and Emma Kittle Pey

Thursday 27th April at 6.30 pm

Come and meet two authors and hear about their new books.

In a unique partnership this event will be hosted by the irrepressible

Anthony Roberts

on a rare night off from the Arts Centre!

This is a free event but space is limited so please email us@redlionbooks.co.uk to reserve a seat.

Book of the Week, April 22nd 2017

BookThe Crime Writer

Jill Dawson

BookThe Crime Writer

Jill Dawson

  In the 1960’s American crime writer, Patricia Highsmith, rented a cottage in Suffolk She was seeking a quiet hideaway; a place where she could escape her fame and her fans to concentrate on writing. In this novel Jill Dawson takes this period of Highsmith’s life and blends fact with fiction in an imaginative exploration … Continue reading Book of the Week, April 22nd 2017

 

In the 1960’s American crime writer, Patricia Highsmith, rented a cottage in Suffolk She was seeking a quiet hideaway; a place where she could escape her fame and her fans to concentrate on writing. In this novel Jill Dawson takes this period of Highsmith’s life and blends fact with fiction in an imaginative exploration of her mind and her creativity.

And so into the calm of a small, rural village arrives the eccentric, troubled writer. A strong character she may be but, in the grip of severe depression, is turning to drink for consolation. In London she has a secret lover struggling in a destructive marriage and when an ambitious young journalist turns up events take a sinister turn. She finds support from neighbour, friend and confidante, Ronnie, whose gentleness is an island of understanding within the turmoil of her life. In Ronnie, many will recognise Ronald Blythe, now in his nineties and our local literary legend, but then himself a young writer.

Patricia Highsmith’s dark, brooding, psychological mysteries anticipated many trends of modern crime fiction and this powerful novel has much of the same edgy suspense.

Sceptre paperback £8.99

 

Book of the Week, April 15th 2017

Black Widow

Chris Brookmyre

Black Widow

Chris Brookmyre

Diana Jager is a high-flying surgeon. Off duty, as ‘Scalpelgirl’, she writes an anonymous blog that exposes sexism in the medical profession. What she says is not popular in some quarters and when her identity as the blog writer is exposed she becomes the victim of online trolling and some vicious personal threats. She moves … Continue reading Book of the Week, April 15th 2017

Diana Jager is a high-flying surgeon. Off duty, as ‘Scalpelgirl’, she writes an anonymous blog that exposes sexism in the medical profession. What she says is not popular in some quarters and when her identity as the blog writer is exposed she becomes the victim of online trolling and some vicious personal threats. She moves to Scotland, to new job and a new life but when her husband is killed in a road accident just 6 months into a dysfunctional marriage, suspicion quickly falls on Diana herself. Washed up journalist, Jack Parlabane, the maverick hero of many of Brookmyre’s earlier novels, is called in to investigate. He senses a story that might resurrect his career.

But the real detective here is the reader. Through the narrative is sprinkled a trail of clues about what really happened and why. Alongside the investigation of a crime the novel becomes an investigation into the fault lines of a disintegrating marriage. The tension is high, the mystery is complex – and the solution is satisfying

Abacus paperback, £7.99

Book of the Week, April 1st 2017

Strange Labyrinth

Will Ashon

Strange Labyrinth

Will Ashon

It was in 1878 that Epping Forest was formally preserved from enclosure for the benefit of the people of London. But the area has been woodland since Neolithic times and part of the much larger King’s Essex Forest since the 12th century. This is a lively personal exploration of the history of Epping Forest seen … Continue reading Book of the Week, April 1st 2017

It was in 1878 that Epping Forest was formally preserved from enclosure for the benefit of the people of London. But the area has been woodland since Neolithic times and part of the much larger King’s Essex Forest since the 12th century.

This is a lively personal exploration of the history of Epping Forest seen through the lives of some of the colourful characters who lived there.

Dick Turpin and Tom King were the highwaymen who terrorised travellers in the eighteenth century. Their secret hideaway was a cave in the forest large enough to take their horses and provisions.

John Clare, the mad poet, was imprisoned at an asylum in the forest. After four years he escaped and marched alone through the forest, eventually finding his way home.

There was Ken Campbell, avant-garde play write and actor, who, in the 1970’s directed ‘The Warp’. Lasting 23 hours it was the longest play ever staged.

And in the 1980’s, Crass, the most radical, politically engaged band of their era, established a counter cultural commune. One member of that band was Gee Vaucher, now an acclaimed artist with a major exhibition shown recently at Colchester’s Firstsite.

Thee lives of poets and protesters, misfits and mystics tumble through these pages as the author reflects on the extraordinary legacy of London’s public forest.

Granta Hardback, £14.99